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Consumer aviation survey shows drop in satisfaction for flight passengers | Aviation NewsAs airports around the world appear to be placing more and more importance on passenger experience and satisfaction, it is interesting to read that the latest Aviation Consumer Survey results from the CAA show that there is a clear drop in just that. But where are passengers less satisfied?

This, the fifth wave of the UK Aviation Consumer Survey, investigates the current behaviour and attitudes of flight passengers to air travel. The survey looks at every aspect of the passenger journey, from arrival at the originating airport to arrival at the destination airport.

3,500 consumers took part in this survey, selected from a cross-section of UK citizens aged 18+, nationally representative of the population.

The results are used by the Civil Aviation Authority to ascertain the most current and rising aviation issues according to consumers, and to assist in decision-making, regulatory requirements, policy and strategic positioning to improve systems and services.

What to the latest results highlight about passenger satisfaction?

The latest results show that satisfaction amongst flight travellers has been dropping consistently over a two-year period (2016-18). The decreases are slight, but significant, with 90% in the first quarter survey of 2016 to 83% in 2018. However, the decreases in passenger satisfaction are not happening on the ground.

Systems and technologies are streamlining airports of all sizes all over the world, and this is paying off in terms of passenger satisfaction. The reduction in queuing and lengthy security screening processing times have both contributed. Airports in particular have been showing an increasing interest in improving passenger experience, and the latest in self-service technologies have placed greater control of the passenger journey directly into the hands of flight travellers.

The greatest dissatisfactions are happening in the air, during flights and during problematic times, when around half of respondents are worried that any complaints they do have, may be falling on deaf ears.

Speaking about the recent drop in satisfaction, the CAA Director, Tim Johnson said, ‘Delays and disruption can be caused by a range of different factors. Some of these are within the control of airlines, and some are not. Whatever the cause, these delays can be frustrating for passengers. We expect airlines to always provide prompt and accurate information and if passengers are entitled to further care and compensation, this should be provided without delay.

The in-flight experience is making passengers less satisfied, according to survey results. Over two years, the number has fallen from 81% (2016) to 77% (2018), and while still a reasonable satisfaction measurement, it shows a significant drop since 2016.

Where are the least satisfied flight passengers?

An interesting highlight of the survey is that there are regional changes. It seems that flight passengers are more satisfied the further north of the UK they are.

East Midlands travellers are the least happy, at just 76%, with Wales close behind at 78%, where passengers in the north east are 89% happy, on average.

It is widely felt that airports are working hard towards making the ground experience as seamless as possible to improve passenger experience and satisfaction. Infrastructural changes, master systems integration and implementation of the latest innovations in self-service kiosks, biometrics and common use airport systems are all helping to improve not only satisfaction, but also airport operational management.

It is now time for airlines to follow suit and take passenger experience and satisfaction to another level.

Rockwell Collins Award for Customer Service Support from Airbus | Aviation NewsRockwell Collins, leading aviation and high-integrity solutions provider, reached the top five of 43 aviation companies with the recognition of customer services by Airbus last month for the 11th consecutive year.

Airbus and its customer airlines presented the industry-respected Rockwell Collins with a Customer Services Award for its avionics service at the Farnborough Airshow on 18th July during a special ceremony.

The Rockwell Collins team is honoured by the award

Scott Gunnufson, vice president of Sales, Marketing and Customer Support, Commercial Systems for Rockwell Collins, said ‘Our long-standing relationship with Airbus and its airline customers is one that we are very proud of. The Rockwell Collins team is honoured by the recognition and we remain focused on continuously improving support for Airbus and its customers. I commend our dedicated team around the world on their ongoing efforts and dedication.

The recognition was awarded based on several factors from more than 165 global Airbus customers, including in-service feedback, cost, service and customer support.

Airport Operations Integrated with Management SolutionsExelis, aerospace and defence information company headquartered outside Washington, VA, have announced their acquisition of Orthogon; German airport operations management business, providing applications for air traffic flow management and decision-making to airport operators and ANSPs across the world.

The Orthogon business designs and develops traffic optimisation applications and predict traffic demand on runways, giving airport operators flexibility to optimise their resources both on the ground and in the air.

“The acquisition of Orthogon expands our aviation solutions portfolio and international market position,” said Pam Drew, Exelis president of the Exelis Information Systems division. “With our global airport presence and Orthogon’s queue management applications we see opportunities to deliver solutions to our customers that will lower costs and increase capacity and efficiency of their operations.”

Airport management systems integration is a necessary part of the process of information management. Additional applications available from other providers of airport management systems can include ‘back-office’ applications that assist with the smooth and efficient operation of baggage handling systems and passenger processing. As airports grow busier, with estimated passenger flow on the increase to the tune of more than 5% each year, operational productivity can suffer without key integrated systems in place.

Integrated Airport Operations Solutions on Show in DubaiThe fifth annual MRO Middle East Exhibition and Conference will be held at the Dubai World Trade Centre and hosted by Penton’s Aviation Week, information and services provider for aviation and defence industry.

The conference will focus upon ways to maximise aviation efficiency using enhanced management practices while facing the issue of reducing costs; a growing concern amongst airports and operators across the world. The fact remains that streamlining airport operations is a high priority throughout the industry and solutions must be found to increase operational productivity while keeping a close eye on cost efficiency.

At the exhibition hall, product and service providers will be showcasing their solutions, including the latest in technological advancements, tools resources and services to help address some of the difficulties faced by global airports and operators.

Airport Operations Management ProvidersA major shake-up has seen Tulsa International become independent from the City of Tulsa in a move, initially approved by Mayor Dewey Bartlett, that has now been officially agreed by Tulsa Airports Improvement Trust (TAIT).

The agreement will now give the airport more freedom for airport operations management, although, the city of Tulsa will retain control of the airport through TAIT board members appointed by the Tulsa City Council, Tulsa Airport Authority will now lease the airport from the city on a 25-year term.  This will allow it to contract out or hire in for services such as legal, IT and human resources support which were previously provided by Tulsa City which was then reimbursed by the airport. However, some services will continue to be provided by the city and Tulsa International’s 150 employees will remain on their current pension plan.

Passenger numbers at Tulsa International declined 0.3% to 1.316 million in 2013, with an overall decline of 18.5% since 2007. This decline is set against an overall operating budget of $58.5 million in 2013, though airport officials believe the leasing arrangement will enable them to make savings of $500,000.