Archive

Tag Archives: biometric security

Biometric Airport Technology | Airports NewsSince biometrics were introduced to the US airports market more than a decade ago, the uptake has still been pretty slow in adopting broad biometric measures.

Recently however, the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has been making sounds in favour of the introduction of greater levels of biometric technology across the country, particularly facial recognition.

How does facial biometric recognition work?

Facial biometric recognition technology can process information quickly – near real-time – and unobtrusively within the airport environment.

In simple terms, the way the system works places a camera within the airport, typically at passport control or other security area, and compares a live image of the travellers’ face with their travel documentation to determine an exact feature match. Using an automated biometric facial matching identification system, the process can be completed in seconds, speeding up the system of passenger processing significantly.

This increased efficiency is key to improving airport operations, particularly when integration with other airport systems can take place.

The trouble is that in the US, governments and departments cannot decide whether investment into biometric technology, both financial and resources, is for the public or the private sector. However, inroads are being built, as the CBP has announced the intention to use biometrics for foreign nationals leaving the US.

There is little doubt across the aviation industry, particularly within the commercial airlines sector, that biometric technology is the way forward for airport security and borders management. One of the key factors in favour of biometrics, aside from the efficiency factor, is the elimination of potential human error in checking travel documentation.

Travellers, according to the experts, could expect to be using their faces as boarding passes within the next three to five years, once infrastructural and operational challenges and investments can be shaken out within the industry. As passenger experience seems to be high on the agenda for the major players in the industry, biometric technology could be a real possibility.

self-service-tech-schipholSome of the very latest biometric technology and self service solutions are on trial at Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport this year, in conjunction with Holland’s most famous airline, KLM.

The new technology on trial will involve volunteer passengers, who will board their flights without taking their passports out of their bags, or showing their boarding passes to any personnel at the airport.

Facial recognition technology will be used during the three-month trial, which will test the process thoroughly, including how user-friendly the completely self-service system will be, in addition to its effectivity, reliability and speed of processing.

Schiphol Airport spokesperson said, ‘The ultimate goal is to make the boarding process as easy and quick as possible for passengers. The trial will take place at a selected gate at the airport. To use facial recognition for boarding, passengers must register first. There is a special registration kiosk in the waiting area at the gate. KLM staff will assist with the procedure.’

Schiphol Airport has been at the forefront of trialling new technology, and is also taking part in tests and trials for a new hand baggage scanner, which in the future may negate the necessity for removal of laptops, liquids and other items from hand baggage.

Airport security providers around the world are striving to introduce solutions for passenger processing and security screening that will increase efficiency. Common use identity management solutions have been proved to improve passenger flow, while maintaining security. Such solutions can only serve to improve efficiency, productivity and passenger satisfaction, which is a welcome break for the modern, busy airport facing challenges and increasing mandatory security requirements year-on-year.

airport-securityPublic opinion varies wildly about the effectivity of airport screening, with many passengers simply feeling violated after security screening, rather than safer.

The TSA has been around for 15 years, and recent reports suggest that screening personnel are under-performing. Some think that there is too much focus on the process of screening, and not enough on performance, which could lead to another terrorist attack.

Perhaps the answer lies in automated airport security, and with the introduction of sophisticated biometric security systems, why not? If human error is to be blamed for under-performance, then airports around the world are bound to become reliant on technology to keep borders secure.

Providers of information management and security solutions | Business Aviation BlogIt is with interest that the latest report from TechNavio entitled ‘Global Aerospace Components Aviation Security Market 2015-2019’ has been studies by the industry.

With global threats to the aviation security sector coming thick and fast, and not just focussing on physical security, but cyber security, airports infrastructure and information management, the industry is all too aware that the world is watching.

TechNavio predict that the global aviation security sector will continue to grow at a rate of just over 7% through the years 2014-2019. Increased investment is expected in biometrics technology, screening and the latest radio frequency identification (RFID).

Improving Personnel Access SecurityPassenger security improvements are highlighted this week as the world resumes business travel after the holiday break. As the industry as a whole tightens security across the world’s borders, the question must be raised about the lengths airports are prepared to go to to improve security for personnel access when Atlanta airport admit that 150 guns were smuggled onto aircraft over a seven-month period last year.

A Delta Airlines baggage handler was involved in a smuggling operation that saw guns carried through secure areas of Atlanta Airport to find their way onto the streets of New York.

This clearly demonstrates that personnel access measures need to be tightened in order to ensure that passengers and crew are safe. Airport personnel should be screened in the same way as passengers, say the authorities, and airports should be encouraged to put security measures in place.

Airport security providers offer critical infrastructure protection across the board, and solutions are available to ensure that access control can be regulated throughout the airport environment – for passengers, airline staff and also for information security.

Passengers need the reassurance that staff are screened just as effectively as they are themselves and the instances of smuggling simply highlight the grey areas of airport security.